Julia Galloway, "Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar", Object #12
Julia Galloway, "Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar", Object #12
Julia Galloway, "Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar", Object #12
Julia Galloway, "Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar", Object #12

Julia Galloway, "Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar", Object #12

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Spadefoot Toad Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info:

Size: 7.5 x 7.5 x 9.5 

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

12. SPADEFOOT TOAD

The spadefoot toad is a small, plump reptile with smooth skin and tiny warts. It gets its name from the single sharp-edged spade on each hind foot, which it uses to dig itself up to eight feet into the ground. One distinct characteristic of the spadefoot toad is its pupils. Most other toads and frogs have horizontal pupils, while the spadefoot has vertical pupils, giving it a cat-like appearance. This nocturnal species prefers dry, sandy areas with temporary ponds and plenty of leaf litter.

Destruction of suitable habitat due to urbanization is a major threat to this subterranean toad. Many individuals are killed while crossing roads. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection in New England conducts a variety of research and management programs to restore and protect endangered species, such as the spadefoot toad, as well as their habitats, to promote thriving populations. The eastern spadefoot was placed on the endangered list in 2005 when living populations were only found in two of their known locations. One possibility for their low population size could be that breeding pools and ponds “often dry up before the tadpoles get to complete metamorphosis”.

In 2004, the western spadefoot toad was the only member of the family Scapiopodidae to be classified as near threatened by the IUCN Red List. All other species, including the eastern spadefoot, were listed as least concern. Presently, all species' conservation status requires reviewing. Supporting land trust so undeveloped tracts of land in New England can remain so will help this species dramatically.

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