Julia Galloway, "Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar", Object #10
Julia Galloway, "Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar", Object #10
Julia Galloway, "Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar", Object #10
Julia Galloway, "Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar", Object #10

Julia Galloway, "Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar", Object #10

Regular price
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Sale price
$240.00

Title: Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size: 6.5 x 6.5 x 10.5

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

10. SEDGE WREN

The Sedge Wren is a small, secretive bird that is best distinguished from other wrens by its streaked crown and back, faint buff-colored eye stripes, and short, upright tail. In New England, sedge wrens colonize in damp meadows early in the nesting season, but once the summer heat dries up these areas, the wrens move to permanently wet marshland to raise a second brood. It is often hard to see as it creeps about in damp sedge meadows of the east and midwest, occasionally coming up to give its dry rattling song. As a summer resident it is oddly erratic in many areas, showing up and breeding one summer and then vanishing again. Overall, its numbers seem to be gradually declining.

Sedge wrens are a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird of Conservation Concern in the northeast. And as a migratory bird, sedge wrens are also protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Along with these forms of protection, ongoing surveys should be conducted to establish areas where sedge wrens nest, placing strict regulations around these habitats to ensure their breeding grounds are safe and protected. Previously listed as a species of special concern, the sedge wren is now considered a threatened species in New York State. It is a very rare and local breeder and has experienced population declines throughout its breeding range. New York records are mostly from the St. Lawrence Valley and Lake Ontario Plain. In the Northeast the sedge wren is a species of management concern. The biggest threat to sedge wren populations is the loss of breeding habitat due to the draining of wetlands. Supporting existing wetlands and inventing in land trust will help this species.

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