Julia Galloway, "New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar", Object #8
Julia Galloway, "New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar", Object #8
Julia Galloway, "New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar", Object #8
Julia Galloway, "New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar", Object #8

Julia Galloway, "New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar", Object #8

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: New England Cottontail Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size: 6.5 x 6.5 x 10

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

8. NEW ENGLAND COTTONTAIL 

The New England cottontail also known as the gray rabbit, wood hare, wood rabbit, cooney, and brush rabbit, is found throughout the New England area. The cottontail likes to live in higher elevation woodlands, scrublands, and bushlands. Female cottontails are larger than the males, and both are brown in coloration.The rabbits’ favorite foods include grasses, woody plants, fruits, flowers, and a variety of other herbaceous vegetation. Breeding season for the cottontails happens two to three times a year, and each litter contains three to eight offspring. Females single-handedly raise their young, but this only lasts for the first few weeks and the juvenile rabbits quickly leave the nest. 

In the listed states of Maine and Rhode Island, the New England cottontail rabbits are endangered primarily due to loss of habitat. Rabbits need at least 12 acres of dense thicket habitat to fully grow and sustain their populations. In the past few decades, many thicket habitats have been lost as a result of reduced beaver activity, natural storms, wildfires, and hurricanes. Restorations of the wetland and shrublands are being conducted using federal funding. Landowners in the listed states who are willing to grow the thicket groves can receive federal subsidies as an incentive for helping promote the species. In 2013, the State of Connecticut embarked on a habitat restoration project in Litchfield County, clearing 57 acres of mature woods to create a meadowland and second-growth forest needed by the rabbit. Supporting local land trust either financially or through volunteering would help this a most threatened species.

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