Julia Galloway, "Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar", Object #6
Julia Galloway, "Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar", Object #6
Julia Galloway, "Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar", Object #6
Julia Galloway, "Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar", Object #6

Julia Galloway, "Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar", Object #6

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Hawksbill Sea Turtle Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size:6 x 6 x 9.5

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

6. HAWKSBILL SEA TURTLE 

As a marine sea turtle, the hawksbill has a carapace protecting its flattened body and legs that act as flippers to help them swiftly swim through the ocean. Unlike other sea turtles, the hawksbill has a curved beak that is extremely sharp and can quickly tear through seaweed or sea sponges. Many of the sponges, jellyfish, and other organisms the turtles prey on are very poisonous and easily kill most species that try to consume them, but the turtles’ digestive system has formed a resistance to their toxins, and they can consume them without any problems.  These turtles nest at intervals of 2 to 4 years. Nests between 3 to 6 times per season. Lays an average 160 eggs in each nest. Eggs incubate for about 60 days. A unique feature of the hawksbill is that they are the first reptile known to be able to exhibit fluorescence. This means that when the turtle can then re-emit fluorescent light from their body after absorbing the fluorescent protein from the consumed organism. They are listed as Endangered (in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future) in 1970 under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Internationally they are listed as Critically Endangered (facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future) by the IUCN

Many parts of the world illegally harvest the internationally protected hawksbill sea turtle for their meat, bones, and shells. However, sea turtles are considered a delicacy and are sold throughout China and Japan, and the hawksbill sea turtle is the harvesting for their prized shell, often referred to as “tortoise shell.” In some countries the shell is still used to make hair ornaments, jewelry, and other decorative items. In addition, the destruction of nesting and feeding habitat, pollution, boat strikes, coastal development, entanglement in fishing gear, consumption of their meat and eggs, and destructive fishing practices like dynamite fishing. Dynamite fishing uses explosives to stun or kill fish, usually on reefs, for easy collection. The practice also causes extensive damage to coral reefs and harms other animals that may be nearby. Sea turtles often mistake plastic pollution for jellyfish, leading them to have clogged digestive systems or starvation.  Every year on Cape Cod, the Massachusetts Audubon Society and the Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary rescues cold stunned sea turtles and transports them the New England Aquarium for treatment.

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