Julia Galloway, "Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar", Object #5
Julia Galloway, "Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar", Object #5
Julia Galloway, "Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar", Object #5
Julia Galloway, "Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar", Object #5

Julia Galloway, "Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar", Object #5

Regular price
Sold out
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Fin Whale Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then painted with mother of pearl luster and china paint. Information about species listed below.

Size:7 x 7 x 8

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

5. FIN WHALE

The fin whale, a baleen whale also known as the finback whale or razorback whale, is the second-largest species in the world. The whales’ colorization is dark grey-brown and when feeding they can remain underwater for up to seventeen minutes. Usually, fin whales only dive for a few minutes at a time, and when resting they expel water through their blowholes every couple of minutes. Sexual maturity is reached between 6-12 years of age and the females birth a calf every 2-3 years. Single births are generally common, but scientists have recorded fin whales having up to six babies at once. Although the whale become sexually mature within the first decade of their life, they do not fully physically mature until the age of 25-30. The oldest recorded fin whale was 94 years old, though the species is estimated to live up to 135-140 years. Also known as the “greyhound of the sea” due to its slim body and quick speed, the baleen whale can reach up to 29 mph and consistently swims at speeds between 23-25 mph.

Like other whale species, during the 20th century fin whales were viciously hunted for their blubber, oil, and baleen. Between 1904-1975, over 704,000 fin whales were harvested. In 1976, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) protected fin whales throughout the southern hemisphere, and today fin whales are protected by the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). This legislation provides global protection for the species, restoration for their historic region, and mitigates obstacles that may interfere with their migration patterns. The species is still in recovery, but with the protection from the CMS and other legislation pieces like it, the species is on the road to recovery. 

There is significant legal support for whales, however they are still harvested in Iceland and Japan. Due to climate change the temperature of the ocean is rising, which is the biggest threats to all whales and dolphins today; it is unclear how to combat this.

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