Julia Galloway, "Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn", Object #4
Julia Galloway, "Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn", Object #4
Julia Galloway, "Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn", Object #4
Julia Galloway, "Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn", Object #4

Julia Galloway, "Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn", Object #4

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Ebony Boghunter Dragonfly Urn

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Mother of pearl luster on the wings, Information about species listed below.

Size: 6.5 x 6.5 x 10

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

4. EBONY BOGHAUNTER 

The ebony boghaunter is also known as the Fletcher’s dragonfly for entomologist Fletcher Williamson in 1923. They are the smallest member of the emerald family, and as such have a greenish, metallic colorization. Boghaunters can be found only in the northeastern bogs of North American and southeastern bogs of Canada. This limited habitat makes them extremely rare. Their flight season is very short and ranges only a couple, brief months in the summer. After this season, the dragonflies reproduce, lay their eggs, and die. The eggs are laid near or in water and a nymph emerges when the egg hatches. The nymphs live in pools of water and undergo up to fifteen separate molts through early spring. At this time, the nymph molts one final time and leaves the water as an adult dragonfly.

Habitat destruction has been the primary threat to the boghaunter from pollution and physical development. Chemicals from agricultural runoff, septic systems, pesticides, and mining have the potential to alter the health of the water source this species resides in. Most boghaunter regions in the state of Massachusetts are protected by USFWS; however, there are other sites, especially in the Worcester/Monadnock ecoregions, where surveys need to be conducted to see if they have ebonies. The best way to help this species is to reduce the use of pesticides through crop rotation, manual weed removal and organic alternatives. In addition, there is significant information about how to save and develop clean water practices.

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