Julia Galloway, "American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar", Object #2
Julia Galloway, "American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar", Object #2
Julia Galloway, "American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar", Object #2
Julia Galloway, "American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar", Object #2

Julia Galloway, "American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar", Object #2

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: American Bumblebee Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size: 7 x 7 x 12

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

2. AMERICAN BUMBLEBEE

 The American Bumblebee tends to live and nest in open farmland and fields. It feeds on several food plants, favoring sunflowers and clovers. Once the most prevalent bumblebee in the United States as its name suggests, it’s populations have decreased significantly in recent years. Bumble bees are generalist foragers and need nesting habitat in the spring, flowers for adult and larval nutrition throughout the spring and summer, and sites for queens to overwinter. This bumble bee nests above ground and underground. Such species often use long grass or hay stacks above ground or abandoned rodent nests underground in south facing exposures. Foraging habitat should include flower abundance and species richness with overlapping blooms to ensure nectar availability throughout the growing season.

Bumble bees are generally host to a diversity of parasitoids in which the larvae grow inside the living host. The majority of parasitoids for bumble bees are flies and about 30 percent or more bees within the area can be infected. The process of parasitism consists of the fly attaching to the bee in flight. The larval fly hatches within the bee host and develops by feeding on the host’s tissues. The bee lives for about two weeks before dying. The fly then pupates and spends the winter inside the bee, fully developed, before it emerges the following year.  Hibernating queen bumble bees are parasitized by a nematode worm. This parasite does not reduce life span, but instead causes the sterilization of the queen.

Current research states that American Bumblebee is uncommon and is significantly declining. Once the most abundant species throughout the southern United States, it is now a rare species. Conservation efforts are encouraged in order to maintain the species including agriculture with wildlife-friendly techniques including hedgerows and pest management. It is important to plant local flora and fauna if possible, and to cut down on pesticides use.

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