Julia Galloway, "Nine Spotted Ladybug Urn/ covered jar", Object #9
Julia Galloway, "Nine Spotted Ladybug Urn/ covered jar", Object #9
Julia Galloway, "Nine Spotted Ladybug Urn/ covered jar", Object #9
Julia Galloway, "Nine Spotted Ladybug Urn/ covered jar", Object #9

Julia Galloway, "Nine Spotted Ladybug Urn/ covered jar", Object #9

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Sedge Wren Urn Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size: 6.5 x 6.5 x 10.5

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

9. NINE SPOTTED LADYBUG

The nine-spotted ladybug has been the state insect of New York since 1989, though its numbers have declined as the numbers of introduced species such as the seven-spotted ladybug and Asian lady beetle have increased. It was for some time thought extinct in New York,  so in 2006, the state considered designating the pink spotted ladybug as state insect instead, but the bill did not pass the Senate. In 2006 the nine-spotted ladybug was rediscovered in Virginia (the first East Coast sighting in 14 years).  In 2011, about 20 of these ladybugs were found on a farm in Amagansett, New York, the first such sighting in the state since 1982. 

The Lost Ladybug Project reported a single known location in New York with 21 nine-spotted lady beetles from an organic farm in Amagansett in 2011. Prior to this discovery, it was assumed to be likely extirpated from the state. Agricultural land has been declining in New York since the 1880s resulting is less suitable habitat for many lady beetle species. Between 1940 and 1997, there was a 57% decline in farmed land in New York. It appears that competition with other aphid-eating insects are leading to the insects demise. Preservation of undeveloped lands and farmland would maintain or increase suitable open habitat. Pesticide use should be avoided when possible. If pesticide use cannot be avoided: use chemicals that target only the pest, treat only infested areas, and select chemicals that do not persist over time.


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