Julia Galloway, "Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar", Object #7
Julia Galloway, "Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar", Object #7
Julia Galloway, "Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar", Object #7
Julia Galloway, "Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar", Object #7

Julia Galloway, "Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar", Object #7

Regular price
$240.00
Sale price
$240.00

Title: Houghton Goldenrod Urn/ covered jar

Descriptive info: Midrange porcelain, wheel thrown, carved, painted with underglaze, fired in a soda kiln and then china painted. Information about species listed below.

Size: 5.5 x 5.5 x 9.5

Shipping cost: $45.00

Proceeds from the sale of this object benefit the artist, Artaxis, and a land trust in the states where the species live. Please contact us at contactartaxis@gmail.com if you would like to ship this object out of the US, or if you have any questions.

7. HOUGHTON GOLDENROD

Houghton's goldenrod was named in honor of Douglass Houghton, a doctor, botanist, civic leader, and Michigan's first State Geologist. During the geological survey of Michigan in 1839, Houghton discovered this species of goldenrod in Mackinac County between what are now the communities of Naubinway and Epoufette, on the north shore of Lake Michigan. Many people believe that goldenrod causes hay fever. Goldenrods are unfairly blamed because their showy flowers bloom at the same time as less conspicuous ragweed flowers that cause itching and sneezing. In fact, goldenrod pollen is too heavy to be carried on the wind like tree pollen. Instead, goldenrod pollen is carried by the insects that pollinate the flowers and is not wasted on the wind or allergy sufferers.

To conserve the remaining populations of Houghton's goldenrod, private, corporate, and public landowners and land managers who are likely to have Houghton's goldenrod on their Great Lakes shoreline property are being contacted. Houghtons Goldenrod is struggling on account of land development and weed killer. Landowners have the opportunity to assist in the preservation of this remarkable component of Michigan's natural heritage. The vast majority of threatened and endangered species live on private lands, so goodwill and cooperation is needed for threatened species to survive.

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